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 The Best Thing To Transcribe On..., Tomes, Grimoire, Bookbinding
Qcks
post May 19 2012, 02:26 PM
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So... I'm new to all this magical stuff, and i want to start a record of my magical experimentation.

I'm a fairly big believer in putting as much of myself into whatever i'm doing as i can.

As such, i thought i might be as literal as i can and i'm interested in scribing my book in my own blood.
In a very literal way, i'd be putting bits of myself into my magical tome.

That said, as part of my reason for practicing magic, i think that blood on paper might not work so well for me.
I want something that will long out last me and bear witness to my existence to the external, collective reality for a much longer time then i will be around.

So.... i've been thinking of trying engraved metal as a stand in for traditional paper.
Copper or aluminum sheets can easily be marked with a nail or some other sharp steel implement, so it seems like that might be the way to go, but cost is a concern (for now anyway).

I'm wondering what some of the occult qualitites, if any, are inherant in aluminum (according to you the reader)?
Regardless i need to experiment with engraving unfolded aluminum cans to make sure they hold the impressions from an engraving under adverse conditions (i plan on putting it on a bookshelf, but, in 50 years, who knows where it'll be). Foil is probably too thin to hold an engraving for any significant length of time. .

I may default back to blood on paper with some different protections in place on it.

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☞Tomber☜
post May 21 2012, 10:34 AM
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Why would you use your own blood? That's not really useful, kind of creepy, and not good practice (imo, imo... I know).

You seem more interested in the theatrics, or art, than in the magic. If you want to do magic, choose a branch and just start doing it. No need for frills, moonlit sacrifices, or blood grimories. If it seems like older magicians got to do all the cool stuff and that I am doing nothing more than trying to hold you back, then go a head with whatever you want, but unless you know why you are doing something, why you are using something, and what those things symbolize, you can't expect to get spiritual/occult results.

In fairness this could be worse though, for example, using your blood for writing sigils/offerings with demonic evocations or something like that.

I understand the desire for having cool occult stuff like this (who around here doesn't?), but this just isn't necessary and will probably only serve as a distraction from real magic work.

Goodluck though

This post has been edited by ☞Tomber☜: May 21 2012, 10:35 AM


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QUOTE(Vagrant Dreamer @ Jan 30 2013, 02:19 AM) *
Expect nothing, or you will get caught up in the future and not pay attention to the present. Just do the practice diligently, do it because you enjoy it, do it because you believe in it. Don't wait for results, don't wait for it to happen.

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Vagrant Dreamer
post May 21 2012, 01:13 PM
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There is an easy combination available that will make this much easier to accomplish on both counts.

First, use stone paper - if you google it you will find several sources. It will last practically forever assuming it isn't destroyed, and it will trap the ink that you use on it in such a way that it will not fade for a very, very long time. If what you produce is subjectively valuable enough to be passed down, it could potentially be seen by your descendants centuries from now and look virtually the same as it was when you penned it.

For blood, a single drop in some ink will suffice, it does not have to be all written in blood, once a drop is mixed with the ink, the link you are looking for is established. Just don't lose the ink.

I would suggest two books - one for notes to be arranged and prepared, and the other for the actual transcription. This way you don't waste ink and pages. I would also recommend handbinding your own book - it is not difficult to do, although you might want to make a practice book first and correct your mistakes afterwards.

peace


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The world is complicated - that which makes it up is elegantly simplistic, but infinitely versatile.

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Qcks
post May 21 2012, 04:22 PM
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QUOTE("Tomber")
Why would you use your own blood?


Because it is a very literal representation of my mortal existence.

I'm not suggesting that everyone who writes in their tome should do so in blood. I dare say that, by and large, it's completely inappropriate. However, in my particular case, i think it'd be okay.
Vagrant Dreamer is correct that a single drop placed into an ink well would establish the symbolic link I'm looking for just as easily, and i'll probably go with that rather then penning the whole thing in blood.

I would never do this using the blood of someone or something else (willing or otherwise).
That would actually run counter to the entire purpose of the book.

QUOTE("Vagrant Dreamer")
First, use stone paper - if you google it you will find several sources. It will last practically forever assuming it isn't destroyed, and it will trap the ink that you use on it in such a way that it will not fade for a very, very long time. If what you produce is subjectively valuable enough to be passed down, it could potentially be seen by your descendants centuries from now and look virtually the same as it was when you penned it.


Interesting. I like it, but the only information available on it is how eco-friendly it is, rather then how durable it is.

I'll look into it more, but i'm going to need a bit of time, since it's not easily available here (I've got to have it delivered from out of state).

Having done a little research into aluminum, aluminum foil actually works better then thicker aluminum products, and engraving it with a pointed object is very similar to writing on paper.

QUOTE
I would suggest two books - one for notes to be arranged and prepared, and the other for the actual transcription. This way you don't waste ink and pages. I would also recommend handbinding your own book - it is not difficult to do, although you might want to make a practice book first and correct your mistakes afterward


two solid ideas.
Writing out thoughts a bit in advance so that they can be organized and refined before being transcribed helps the person reading the book after the fact.
As for practicing book binding, I've actually done a fair amount of that, using both modern and more traditional methods, but i could stand to have a bit more practice.

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Vagrant Dreamer
post May 22 2012, 11:50 AM
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QUOTE(Qcks @ May 21 2012, 06:22 PM) *

Interesting. I like it, but the only information available on it is how eco-friendly it is, rather then how durable it is.


I have subjected mine to a few tests, from crumpling it up and dipping it in water, to burying a single sheet for a few weeks, enough time for it to rain three or four times and in the hot georgia spring, and that sheet didn't degrade at all, and the ink is still as clear as it was when I wrote on it. I actually washed it off with water afterwards. I hear both sides of the eco-friendly nature of the material, but couldn't say one way or another whether those claims are true or not. You can usually find notebooks made of the stuff at walgreens, wal-mart, etc. if you want to get some to play around with. I haven't seen it in these places unlined and proper for bookbinding.

QUOTE
Having done a little research into aluminum, aluminum foil actually works better then thicker aluminum products, and engraving it with a pointed object is very similar to writing on paper.


This material, however, will not last very long and have to be very carefully kept. Likewise, if someone uncaring gets a hold of it, it would be very easy get destroyed simply through negligent handling.

QUOTE

Writing out thoughts a bit in advance so that they can be organized and refined before being transcribed helps the person reading the book after the fact.
As for practicing book binding, I've actually done a fair amount of that, using both modern and more traditional methods, but i could stand to have a bit more practice.


I dislike little more than binding a book and then casually making notes in it only to realize later that I feel I have wasted the book. I make my notes in simple notebooks and then pen them into my bound books carefully, with attendant images and embellishments.

peace


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