Help - Search - Members - Calendar
Full Version: Magician, Sorcerer, Wizard?
Sacred Magick Forums > Specific Paths > Sorcery
Pages: 1, 2
MagicIsMight
Good evening,

This is perhaps a topic that has been mentioned quite regularly, but what in your opinion should a male practicing magic call himself? Why do some choose to call themselves "magician" instead of "wizard." Next, when should a male, or female for that matter, begin to call themselves by these different names? It is sad to think that an armchair magician is calling himself a great and powerful mage. I understand that these different names have to do a lot with your background, but I thought I'd get everyone's imput on the classification of these sorts of men and women alike. Shouldn't a woman who practices magic be considered a witch? Or shouldn't a male who does the same thing consider himself a magician? Let's keep things simple, right? There seem to always be complications that arise with the term. What do you consider yourself and why? What's your background? Any thoughts would be a very interesting read.

Sincerely,

Mr. Curi
UnKnown1
QUOTE(curi @ Jul 6 2006, 07:59 PM) *
Good evening,

This is perhaps a topic that has been mentioned quite regularly, but what in your opinion should a male practicing magic call himself? Why do some choose to call themselves "magician" instead of "wizard." Next, when should a male, or female for that matter, begin to call themselves by these different names? It is sad to think that an armchair magician is calling himself a great and powerful mage. I understand that these different names have to do a lot with your background, but I thought I'd get everyone's imput on the classification of these sorts of men and women alike. Shouldn't a woman who practices magic be considered a witch? Or shouldn't a male who does the same thing consider himself a magician? Let's keep things simple, right? There seem to always be complications that arise with the term. What do you consider yourself and why? What's your background? Any thoughts would be a very interesting read.

Sincerely,

Mr. Curi


I do Sorcery Shamanism and some Ceremonial Magick. A Wizard would not be a bad term but I like the word Priest. A woman can have any title that a man could. She could be a Sorcereress. As a man is a Shaman so she could be a Shamaness. I think Wizard is a title without gender. At least I have never heard anyone call thier self a Wizardess. So a female Wizard would still be a Wizard.
bym
Perhaps we are placing abit too much emphasis on titles. They invariably are used to 'pigeonhole' one and we run imto the danger of molding ourselves to the title (or viceversa). In the long run people are labelled by their peers with or without help. When I was younger titles meant alot more to me than they do now. Pick one or wait until one picks you, just live your life in the best way you know how. laugh.gif
Vagrant Dreamer
QUOTE(bym @ Jul 6 2006, 09:46 PM) *
Perhaps we are placing abit too much emphasis on titles. They invariably are used to 'pigeonhole' one and we run imto the danger of molding ourselves to the title (or viceversa). In the long run people are labelled by their peers with or without help. When I was younger titles meant alot more to me than they do now. Pick one or wait until one picks you, just live your life in the best way you know how. laugh.gif


Also, they all tend to mean different things to different people. My peers generally use all of the titles interchangably just to refer to 'a person who does magick', largely dependent on the most recent 'theme' of discussion - if we're discussing witchcraft, everyone's a witch, if we're discussing sorcerery, everyone's a sorcerer... But, if you tell ten people you're a sorcerer - which is something you very rarely have any reason to say - then they may all think something different.

If someone asks, I generally just reply, "I'm an occultist." or "I have an affinity for the occult."

All it really does is tell people that you are into some kind of magick, or that you apparently believe in it anyway, or at least want to. To say 'sorcerer' or 'shaman' or 'mage' - mostly buzz words that catch everyone's interest. Less is more...

peace
Khenti_Amenti
At the same time, for the Egyptians names where a part of the soul and knowing someones or something true name meant having some power over him or it.
In Ceremonial Magick Orders titles often have a highly symbolic meaning wich spills over in the actual Magick and is a part of the Initiation.

I myself call myself by any of the titles if i use any.

The etymology of the titles is rather interessting too.

Magician, Mage- Persian priest called "Magi". *Funny enough not actually Magicians.

Sorcerer- From Latin "Sors", Fate.

Warlock- Disputed, either from "Vaer loega", oath breaker. a reason for many Witches to not aprove of the title for a male Witch.
Silly ofcouse since "Pagan" and many other words have also been used in a deregatory meaning.
Could also be from "Varda lockur", Spirit caller.

Hexe- Propably from someone outside the hedge (safe territory).

Hedgewitch- as above. The hedge surounding the village or town is "safe", the witch travels outside it (out of the known universe so to speak).

Wicca- Frm the same root as to wick. The Witch folds or wicks reality. Knotmagick comes to mind.
Female version is Wicce.

Wizard, Wizzard- From the word "wiz", wise.

Witta- from "wit", to know.

There are a few more but their not really apliceable to the western form of mystery or only to certain cultures within it.
xXDaemonReignXx
I like the name sorcerer the best
I consider a witch or wizard to do magick by casting spells and a sorcerer to do magick by calling on the aid of spirits
plus i just like the way it sounds.
xXDaemonReignXx
I think warlock has a nice ring to it.
It depends on what you do someone could call the self a necromancer.
whatever glove fits the hand i guess.
TiacSway
I refer to myself as a "witch" personally.

I've never really taken much time to think why i would call myself a "witch" instead of anything else. I guess it just fit becuase i practice "withcraft".

.02

Tiac
V. Grimm
I believe the original question was answered at length already, so I guess I'll answer the secondary one.

Occultist, primarily Black Magician, Necromancer, Sorcerer, and Chaote.

I'd also like to add that Black Magic as it is titled is mostly a misnomer, in most cultures magic by colors referred to "black" as protection magic.

And that "Necromancer" descends from "Nekros" - Greek for Corpse, and "Manteia" - Greek for Prophecy.
DarK
It's really a hard question, if I were to call myself anything I'd have a million titles.

As far as "Witch" and "Sorceror" are concerned, I'd be more inclined to call myself as a Sorceror, by universal definition.

My personal label is....

(myself).
Lonshi
I tend to think of myself as a magician, as I practice magick eclectically. While I consider my practices spiritual, I do not subscribe to a specific theology or dogma. Also, I do not think a separate designation is required to specify sex.

As regards the term witch, I tend to associate this with individuals, both male and female, who practice Wicca or have similar religious practices. I do realize that not all Wiccans prefer this designation, and some who are not Wiccans also prefer the term witch.

Overall, I have no qualms with whatever term an individual opts to use to describe themselves, even if their definition of that term differs from mine. In my opinion, the terms are simply an effort to describe something, and like many terms, there is often a lack of consensus.

Generally, I find that because occult designations are so ambiguous, by themselves, they frequently cannot be relied upon to accurately portray an individual or their interests.

Ailsa smile.gif
A_Smoking_Fox
i don't use a name for myself. I used to call me a million of things, depending on what subject i was studying at that time.
First i was a wicca, or witch, when i was practising mainly wicca.
When i was mainly doing ceremonial magick i called myself a ceremonial mage.
Then i was a chaote, when my interest shifted towards that
When my focus moved to taoism and other eastern philosophies, i called myself a taoist.
Then, when i focused more mainly on buddhism, i was a buddhist.

Now i just am, and dont't care one bit about what title i have.
If my friends ask about my philosohpies, i say that i am a buddhist, because people seem to easily accept buddhism as an alternative faith.
Its just a lie, although i focus highly on enlightenment in my practises, but its to ease their mind and to avoid conversations they or i do not want having.
Thorn
I guess generally I go by 'witch' if I'm in a position where a title is needed, but I find that everyone sees certain titles like witch, sorcerer, shaman, whatever differently. So for the most part I just say I'm 'magickally inclined' and leave it at that:P
matt
i was wondering if you could give me some insight on how to get my root hold in magick i dont have any one that could give me any help i read some of your post and you seem to be well educated in the arts and just thought you might be able to tell me what i need to get started such as suppliers and maybe some stuff that would be good reading
thanx
Xenomancer
I am who I am.

Thats all that i really need to know. I am myself. I am me. I just am. *shrug*

But if I could actually have a title, people would call me either a "Sage" or "Sensei"

blablabla.gif
LordArthur
I consider myself a Magician, Mage or Omnimancer (since I practice Omnimancy). I mostly use the nomenclature of Mage for myself. I started with Norse Runes and dabbled in Enochian about 15 years ago for a year or two before going the way I went to give more background.

I'm not sure if a male/female difference in terms should matter at all, but in some magical "cultures" it seems to as it suits their needs.

I suppose names are used based on the images it gives oneself, which obviously includes their familiarity. What one calls oneself has much to do with what they want others to think about them when they hear the name. To give others the same images about themselves that they are trying to show of themselves.

The problem is, everyone has different images with different spins on them. There are no standards, partially because everyone wants THEIR standard to be standard. wink.gif An ocean of magical practitioners that can't interact well because the definitions they use for the same terms are different even though they use the same language. Sad really.

Definitions of names are too influenced by Pop Culture (either by movies or other media) who didn't really care what the original definitions were anyway, so their definitions become the new ones, which just confuses matters more. The example of Witch being a female, and a Warlock being Male in my own head comes from the TV series "Bewitched". Wiccans say that all members of their faith are witches. There are many witches that aren't wiccan. Some use the Bewitched definitions, some don't.

In the end, definitions seem to be defined by the masses, even if academia says it should be otherwise. Sometimes academia wins, but for more often it doesn't. It's kind of like trying to define what's "pagan". There is no one answer. Mage, Wizard, Witch, Warlock, etc. become umbrella terms. Best you can hope for if you want more information is for them to talk about what they do more directly. Best definition of WHEN to start calling yourself such names is when you feel its right. Without a hard definition of such terms, that's the best one can hope for.
Kraussisus
QUOTE(LordArthur @ Jan 11 2007, 01:35 PM) *
I consider myself a Magician, Mage or Omnimancer (since I practice Omnimancy).


I'm alittle confused. From my knowledge of the suffix "-mancy", Omnimancy would mean being able to predict events from anything?

When I was little, (Some would probably still consider me little) I used to have my tiny grimoire that I made out of sewed together leaves and all my other magic tools, I would think "If dad ever found out I was a witch, he'd disown me!"
But, later, I began to dislike the name. It wasn't for what it represented or the way it sounded, it was just a spontaneous dislike.
So I tried out many different names. I stuck with "chaote" for awhile when I happened to stumble upon that particular area of magick.
But then I began to dislike that name as well.
Now, I usually just say that "magically influenced" and people call me what they want.
LordArthur
QUOTE(Kraussisus @ Apr 1 2007, 06:40 PM) *
I'm alittle confused. From my knowledge of the suffix "-mancy", Omnimancy would mean being able to predict events from anything?


The name was derived by the more modern interpretation of "-mancy". In the original latin, you are correct, it would mean "divination by", however in the modern context the suffix -mancy is greatly expanded and includes the concept of magic. Hence "necromancy" isn't considered simply divination by the dead by most people, but a magical system involving the dead, which CAN including divination by the dead. I don't speak latin, and it's likely you don't either, so it's generally not a concern by most.

The Omni part more refers to the many "schools"/divisions of magic practiced within the system that became too numerous to put under a simplier title.

I hope that answers your question.
Fearn
I have a few different terms I use, and I usually use all of them laugh.gif

Witch-I use this is reference to Witchcraft, and by witchcraft I mean the practice of magic

Pagan/Irish Reconstructionist-I use this in reference to my religious beliefs, however when I am around close minded people I just use the term "in my religion."

So in my coven, we are Witches. We practice magic, and keep a book of spells as well as herbal remides, crystal magic, Divination etc. We may invoke a God/ess for some reason, and anyone who doesn't want to work with that god needn't come.

In my coven we have 2 Wiccan Witches, a Buddhist Witch, an Athiest Witch, a Christian Witch (Just as a note she has like a million reasons why she can still be a christian and a witch), and Me (whatever the heck I am laugh.gif)...
Lucian
Ave

I was going back over some old topics on OccultForums and I passed by this idea again, that Wizard just means Wise person. I mean, would you go around calling yourself exceptionally wise? Just like in martial arts, if you call yourself a Master, you aren't. It is more of a title that the people around you will grace you with if you are worthy of it.

That being said, I like to be called Todd smile.gif

Stop worrying about titles and get to work!

wink.gif

Light In Extension
Aurelius
From my studies ive found many terms and heres what ive found;

mage - tends towards someone who works with generaly more power

sorcerer - is more about the magic its self, usaly self motivated

wizard - someone who seeks all forms of knowlege
beleti
I consider myself to be a Mage. I believe it is all up to that individuals personal preference although what sort of title they choose should compliment the path work they have chosen. As for myself I have always worked with pure energy for the most part with the main focus being manipulations with the use of Will and Intent. I however have been know to utilize herbs crystals and candles to amplify my Will and to focus my Intent. The title Mage in my impression sums up what I do.

There is no right or wrong way to use these titles it simply comes down to what you feel amplifies your actions the most efficient!!

Beleti
Silver Dragon
I try to avoid giving myself any sort of title.



Over time, you risk ego attachments ("Not FROM me, but THROUGH me" is how I would describe my system.)
Eroscupidonamor
Non nobis Domine... non nobis...

Wise thought sorceress... hey that's a title! oops.gif
Uni_Verse
Actually... there are particular associations with the names.

A Magician is a "miracle worker" of the One. Its original ties were to a practitioner of Hermetics, although in modern day it is more associate with Jewish esotericism.

They get their power from a higher source, that which unifies the all.


A Wizard is a master of the Will. A person who does not necessarily believe in a higher power.

They get their power simply through force of Will.

A Sorcerer is more akin to what most people consider a "Black Magician"

Rather than asking spirits to work with them, they force them to do so. Similar to the Wizard who utilizes their Will Power, the Sorcerer does the same - but invokes words of power as curses rather than with reverence.
Fledermaus
QUOTE(Uni_Verse @ Aug 22 2007, 10:15 PM) *
Actually... there are particular associations with the names.

A Sorcerer is more akin to what most people consider a "Black Magician"

Rather than asking spirits to work with them, they force them to do so. Similar to the Wizard who utilizes their Will Power, the Sorcerer does the same - but invokes words of power as curses rather than with reverence.


I don't agree with you on that statement. A Wizard is the "Black Magician" and a Sorcerer is one who mesmerises and is glamorous. A true sorcerer works with nature, becomes nature and is enthralled by nature.
Uni_Verse
QUOTE("Fledermaus")
a Sorcerer is one who mesmerises and is glamorous


Sounds to me like a "Black Magician" - what is the point of a glamour? Just be yourself. smile.gif
shamanwizard
well, according to the ancients, the term sorcerer its different than the term wizard or magician, wizards and magians are seekers of wisdom thru magick,sorcerers are seekers of power thru magick, so I considerd myself more like a wizard or magician apprentice than a sorcerer, I also acept the term shaman or medicine man, and also there is male witches, so basically there is also female wizards, sorcerers, magicians and shamans, let me remind all that magick its an art that was made more powerful by women than men, so this terms are for both wizard.gif witch.gif wandwizard.gif we are all brothers and sisters under this great art!!!!!!!!!
Vagrant Dreamer
QUOTE(wizardgryphon @ Oct 6 2007, 06:45 PM) *
let me remind all that magick its an art that was made more powerful by women than men, so this terms are for both wizard.gif witch.gif wandwizard.gif we are all brothers and sisters under this great art!!!!!!!!!


I'll agree that we're all connected by a common field of interests, but it is impossible to back up the claim that magick was made more powerful by either women or men. Magick isn't powerful, the people who work with it are 'powerful' - as it were, anyway, really they're just strong willed and intelligent, and know how to manipulate the systems of reality to their ends. Magick is simply the application of universal law, and the Law predates manifested gender as we know it. It has nothing to do with being 'powerful.'

The differences between the official meanings of any 'title' simple come from the fact that they all originate in different cultures, who had different languages as well as different descriptions of what magick is, how it works, and what it's for. But regardless of that culture's official definition of their word for 'magick user' - whether it implies someone with spiritual power, or simply someone who utilizes occult sciences of some kind, the element that binds all of those titles together is the fact that they all simply mean, "One who uses obscure/occult means/actions to achieve spiritual/supernormal results."

Mincing words over the meaning of a particular title is pointless - if the world was one culture, the differences would mean more, and the individual titles would describe the different ways that people do magick. As it is, it's just a different cultural take on what's going on and why. Some words were even adapted by foreign cultures or conquering civilizations and used to mean something that became misunderstood as magickal when those cultures lost their foundations and were absorbed by others. If you were to work magick before people of any of the various cultures, they wouldn't call you by whatever title you have picked for yourself, they would call you by whatever they normally use, and it would mean the same thing to them. Regardless of what kind of magick you use or what you use it for, you're still utilizing portions of the same Universal Law, no matter how different or focused your practice is.

I think the most universal title you could take if you had to have one would be "Occultist" - simply someone who studies and/or practices occult techniques, which basically covers everything not a part of mainstream science.

And besides, as we evolve as a culture and the veils of obscurity are slowly brushed away from magick all together, there won't be any need for titles to describe what is essentially just your meta-profession. If everyone in the world was a doctor, we wouldn't call them doctors, we'd call them people. The only reason we use them now is to talk about who does magick and who doesn't.

peace
Koreku
Hmm... I'll have to go with Mage, if only for the fact that it seems to fit what I do. Magician seems like a fake-ish word (ie, stage magician). Wizard just doesn't seem to fit, somehow. Priest seems too religious (I am not part of a magickal religion, I just practice it). Sorcerer also seems to fit as much as mage, but doesn't sound as cool. smile.gif

Somehow I've always liked the word "Mage". I think it's because, for some reason, the picture I get from Mage is a young, ambitious, powerful, truth-seeking, overall just... cool magick user, so I've always called myself by that name. Also, the word sounds inspirational. I know it's odd, but whenever I think of the word or something I want to write a song, work on my book or write a poem.
Thorn
QUOTE(Koreku @ Oct 14 2007, 11:54 AM) *
Hmm... I'll have to go with Mage, if only for the fact that it seems to fit what I do. Magician seems like a fake-ish word (ie, stage magician). Wizard just doesn't seem to fit, somehow. Priest seems too religious (I am not part of a magickal religion, I just practice it). Sorcerer also seems to fit as much as mage, but doesn't sound as cool. smile.gif

Somehow I've always liked the word "Mage". I think it's because, for some reason, the picture I get from Mage is a young, ambitious, powerful, truth-seeking, overall just... cool magick user, so I've always called myself by that name. Also, the word sounds inspirational. I know it's odd, but whenever I think of the word or something I want to write a song, work on my book or write a poem.



I don't know how much of an authority I am on this subject, being female, but I get the same kind of feelings from the word magus (which is basically the same thing.. I think). Very romantic - in the traditional sense - and mystical. The only thing about that and mage is I think it denotes more of a completed stage, the high learned aging merlin, rather than a young apprentice. Just my input:)
Foxglove
I am a sorceress. I define sorcery as magic practiced through the Self, through the raw power of Will alone. I do not ask gods or spirits to do favors for me, and I personally find such dependence to be... distasteful. I am a powerful being in my own rite, perfectly capable of doing the work myself, and I have no need to involve other entities.

I also practice without tools. I always found them to be unnecessary. Plus, chances are that you won't have them with you when you need to cast at a moment's notice. I think that dependence on tools is a weakness. IMO, it's much better to be able to cast with nothing but the sheer force of your own Will.

I consider witchcraft to be a type of magical practice that involves casting circles, burning candles and incense, and chanting various spells and invocations. Most witches work with nature energies, spirits, or pagan gods and goddesses. Too often, I think it seems like nothing but burning colored candles and reciting bad poetry. lol Maybe that's why I'm not a witch.

Most mages I've encountered don't actually believe in real magic. They tend to think that magic is going to the fridge to grab a cold one, or switching on the television, or making a sandwich-- that sort of thing. Whatever floats their boat, I guess.

I've never heard of anyone who claimed to be a wizard, but I'd have to wonder if they may have read Harry Potter a few too many times during their youth. lol

Anyway, these are just my views, based on my own flawed impressions and stereotypes. Labels might be more trouble than their worth, but do make us think about how we define ourselves as individuals. Maybe they're not so bad, after all.
Pandora
The best word I've found for the sort of profession we're describing here is "Imaginer".

Myself, I'm a shifter. Or at least I would be... sad.gif
cryptokiller
Well I have always called myself a Mage, for no other reason than it just feels comfortable.

I never liked the term Chaote, even though I probably still count as one, I am neither a Shaman nor a Witch by my spellcasting style, and the terms Wizard and Sorcerer just seemed a little too 'High Magick' for me.

I do what I do and do it simply, and I like the idea of having a simple name for myself.

cryptokiller
London
UK
Thorn
I guess I've always gone by the term Witch, even though I do agree with that sorceress chick - Foxglove - about her interpretation of witchcraft. I've just never really found a term that suited me. I liked the word sorceress, although a lot of references state sorcery strictly involves the use of spirits and invocations. Whatever feels best, I guess. A lot of times I've just used the term magically-inclined, but now I'm getting kind of curious about this whole nameology thing.
Also I get the impression the word sorceress implies greater strength and power than that of a witch.. sort of a level up, or something. I dont know, something to think about anyways.
SeekerVI
I've never understood the point of tiles. Just 'cause someone in a long black robe, with strange jewelry, and a goatee says he's a Wizaitch-Invoumner of the 99th Specialist Sons of Mercury, doesn't mean it's necesarily true, or that I understand what that all means. I've also known several individuals who all called themselves Wiccan, but didn't seem to share anything except the firm belief that the Goddess was not God linguistically cross-dressing, but another distinct and separate being.

As I consider myself human, I like Source-error. And on occasion Hey You Over There With The Funny Hat, Yes You.
arabian mage999
these days magician are the one the magic tricks it has nothing to do whith spells or spirit summoning . it existed long ago in ancient egypt . 7000 years ago long before solomon.
these magician used slight of hand to turn wooden sticks to snakes. until moses defeated them whith his miracle
Sachiel
As far as calling yourself something...

To the uninitiated, I'd just say "occultist," because that clearly defines what we are, and doesn't possess any of the connotations of falsehood, ineptitude, or megalomania that terms like "Arch-Witch," or "Magus" sometimes evoke.

To those who know what you're talking about, just use a technical term, like, "I'm a necromancer/emotional mage/ astral dabbler" or whatever.

There's not real rank of powers...the terms are often interchangeable.

It is important to note that sorcery amongst people who don't actually practice occultism has a definition which implies the work of evil spirits, magician implies stage acts, and mage sounds very World of Warcraft-esque.

EDIT: I mean all connotations to the uninitiated who do not practice magic and who WILL usually think that terms like witch sound very teenage mainstream...so no offense to anyone.
Koreku
(and mage sounds very World of Warcraft-esque.) /endquote

Sorry to dissapoint you, but Mage has been around long, long before World of Warcraft. I mean no disrespect, but honestly... WoW got it from thousands of other things that used the word mage. It's kind of like saying Wizard or Sorcerer sounds very D+D -ish.

I apologize for the sidetracking, let's get back on topic (whoops)
Sachiel
QUOTE(Koreku @ Oct 29 2007, 06:59 PM) *
(and mage sounds very World of Warcraft-esque.) /endquote

Sorry to dissapoint you, but Mage has been around long, long before World of Warcraft. I mean no disrespect, but honestly... WoW got it from thousands of other things that used the word mage. It's kind of like saying Wizard or Sorcerer sounds very D+D -ish.

I apologize for the sidetracking, let's get back on topic (whoops)

What I meant is, if you're talking to the average non-occultist, their main conception of magic is based on fantasy books and games...and in almost all games possessing a magic element, the term mage is either utilised, or in an online environment the term mage is as standard as, say, "lol."
telempath
I actually call myself a very long title. Psionic Vampiric Mage.

I don't like the term magician. When I hear that, I think of ceremonial magick. I think of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn stuff. I think of all of those silly names, rituals, gestures, spirits, and useless pomp and circumstance things. I find it boring, tedious, and useless (for myself). I think of people blabbing about their toms, grimoires, and magickal orders, going on philosophical tangents that have no meaning to the real world.

I link sorcery to conjuring, controlling, or working with entities.

My boyfriend actually got into wizardry a while back. Interestingly enough, it is the male counterpart to the witch. They both share the same root. I think one means wise woman the other wise man.
Petrus
I've always liked the word "tourist," myself. ;-)

It works right now because I don't really know anything at all yet...it'll work in the future because I probably plan to jump around a lot...and the other cool part is that when people hear it, they automatically assume you're an ignoramus, so you can disarm those who don't know better. diablo.gif
Galren
I go along with Foxglove to an extent, I dont ask entities, I tell them. I do a lot of work with Fate related magic, so a Sorcerer is fairly accurate, as a technical term, it can also mean one who is the source of their magic. Wizards tend to be highly ceremonial magicians, lots of Enochian and Quabbalist stuff. Druids are fairly easy to label, witches can be male or female, Warlock, nice ring to it, means oath-breaker, so its insulting to those in the know.
realm_crawler
insane.gif i would refer to my self as a mad man in training =what i would become would be a mad genius or something
I dont really know but as i see it we are all mad on this planet and the more your called mad the wiser you seem to be. rule.gif
Praxis
These days, I find myself preferring the term Mage.
lordssword
i refer to myself as a Necromancer

enough said
Silver Dragon
QUOTE(Foxglove @ Oct 21 2007, 06:22 PM) *

I am a sorceress. I define sorcery as magic practiced through the Self, through the raw power of Will alone.


ac42.gif




QUOTE

I do not ask gods or spirits to do favors for me, and I personally find such dependence to be... distasteful. I am a powerful being in my own rite, perfectly capable of doing the work myself, and I have no need to involve other entities.



I work with deities, but I channel their power through me.

I call upon them to grant me their wisdom and their magick. I do not ask them to do the work for me.



QUOTE
I also practice without tools. I always found them to be unnecessary. Plus, chances are that you won't have them with you when you need to cast at a moment's notice. I think that dependence on tools is a weakness. IMO, it's much better to be able to cast with nothing but the sheer force of your own Will.


Tools are unreliable, IMO.

They can break, they can be damaged, they can be lost ... without your tools, you're stuck!



QUOTE

I consider witchcraft to be a type of magical practice that involves casting circles, burning candles and incense, and chanting various spells and invocations. Most witches work with nature energies, spirits, or pagan gods and goddesses. Too often, I think it seems like nothing but burning colored candles and reciting bad poetry.


LOL ... I don't do the poetry thing, either.

I'm sorry, but burying three beans under a full moon will neither make you wealthy nor a Size 8.
Dancing Coyote
Well it all depends. To me all these things stated mean different things for conversational use, my peers know what I'm talking about when I say "sorcerer" I mean a person who uses ritual magic and generally is very ceremonial about magical means. They all have their specific meanings for each individual. For me, Witch is considered a sexless title one can easily imagine the meaning behind. If you don't like that choice "Practitioner" has always worked for me. I can understand the problem of figuring out your language for explaining the phenomena, just beware when you name something you put your power over it. You might give yourself a title you'll eventually fall into, and that could be a bad thing.

Now what really interests me is: Why do all Sorcerers have short spiky hair?
HSetesh
I think that Magus (plural: Magi) is the most appropriate signifier.
R.D.Stormsinger
Im not into titles, per se. if i had to choose one, it would be wizard because i strive to learn and understand. Sorcerers were considered black magicians because they would evok spirits to do their dirty work, thereby pretty much taking the quick and easy path to power, rather than learning that power for themselves, and learning the responsability that comes with it. I tolerate mage in a social setting, when im with my order, and wizard when i have to include a title. I dont like priest because im not an ordained priest, even though all christians are considered priests for the Lord. I do not like being called a sorcerer because i view it as a negative title, and i dont like warlock because it is derived from an old word meaning for traitor.

go with what you like, but know that other people could take these terms very wrongly..... which is why i keep my title to myself.
This is a "lo-fi" version of our main content. To view the full version with more information, formatting and images, please click here.
Invision Power Board © 2001-2018 Invision Power Services, Inc.